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Exciting wednesday :)

I had a great opportunity to have 4 models on one whole day of shooting in the college studio. Loved every moment of  it . With a help of 3 lovely make –  up artists           ( Robert Hoary, Sarah Foley & Sarah McCarthy ) I managed to have a really productive day. For the first time I used red backdrop and mixed film & flash lights together. Love experimenting and finding so many creative ways to complete the original idea on the paper🙂 Thanks to everyone who put any effort in making it happen :)You were wonderful🙂

There is few in colour with an interesting back drop:


Model : Jessica McMurry

Model : Jessica McMurry

Loved this January :)

Emily

Emily

Beautiful few shots from the other day, thanks to lovely Emily. Looking forward to February with many more shoots : )

 by Patrick Demarchelier

by Patrick Demarchelier

by  Patrick Demarchelier

by Patrick Demarchelier

The Star

Patrick Demarchelier was born in 1944. For his seventeenth birthday, his stepfather brought him his first Eastman Kodak camera. Demarchelier learned how to develop film, retouch negatives and began shooting friends and weddings. After growing up in the northern seaside town of Le Havre, moving to Paris to work in photo labs as an assistant, Demarchelier began his dream run at British Vogue in the early ‘80s when it was commanded by the likes of Liz Tilberis and Anna Wintour, talent-spotters of the finest water who went on to helm Harper’s Bazaar and American Vogue in the early ‘90s.  Since the late 1970’s he has shot the covers for nearly every major fashion magazine. Demarchelier also shot international advertising campaigns for Dior, Louis Vuitton, Celine, TAG Heuer, Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, Lacoste, Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren. In 1989 he became the official photographer of Princess Diana. He later became the first non-Britain to photograph the British Royal Family. Since 1992 he has worked with Harper’s Bazaar, becoming its premier photographer. Demarchelier was awarded the contract for the 2005 prestigious Pirelli Calendar. In 2007, Mrs. Christine Albanel, Minister of Culture in France, honored Patrick Demarchelier as an Officer de l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres. His book Patrick Demarchelier Photographs was such a success that it was printed a second time after it 12,000 copies were sold. For a long time Patrick Demarchelier didn’t want to expose his work in galleries, much less sell it, until he was convinced otherwise by one of his art collector friends from New York. At that point, he said exposing in galleries felt like: “the beginning of a new career.”  Demarchelier has lived in New York City since 1975, and is considered today one of the top fashion photographers in the world.

Pirelli - calendar - 2008

Pirelli - calendar - 2008


Beautiful model Catherine McGuinness

Beautiful model Catherine McGuinness

Make up done by very talented Sarah Mccarthy, my model : Catherine McGuinness

Make up done by very talented Sarah Mccarthy, my model : Catherine McGuinness

Model : Catherine McGuinness

Model : Catherine McGuinness

Model: Catherine McGuinness

Model:Catherine McGuinness

Model:Catherine McGuinness

Model : Niamh Alana Crawford

Model : Niamh Alana Crawford

Model :Niamh Alana Crawford

Model :Niamh Alana Crawford

sundrench ~by : Kane Longden

sundrench ~by : Kane Longden

( his little note with this photograph : Ah, this was taken on a Canon 85mm 1.2. That lens is actually beautiful. Its just a pity that its so expensive! )

dreams of snowfall by Kane Longden

dreams of snowfall by Kane Longden

f r e e d o m by : Kane Longden

f r e e d o m by : Kane Longden

A little note on the bottom of this one on flickr was : ”

EXAMS ARE OVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Yesssss, I had my very last GCSE today! I am so happy- 3 months of Summer here I come! It was an RE Paper- Lukes Gospel. Fun Fun fun.

This didn’t turn out how I pictured it:\ But I quite like it anyway.😀
It is my school books I am throwing in the air, as I no longer need them!🙂🙂🙂
Geez, I am so happy right now.

To do this I just threw my books up quite a few times on Burst mode and then cloned the paper to make it look like there is loooooaaaaadss😀 ”

downside up ~ by Kane Longden

downside up ~ by Kane Longden

Kane is an eighteen year old Photographer from Derbyshire, nr. Manchester, England.

Kane’s work is heavily influenced by mystery and whimsy. His work is recognisable for his use of bright and airy colours and concepts.

Over the next year Kane hopes to study Photography at University and take his work to another level. Eventually hoping to work in the magazine and media industry as a “full-time” Photographer.

I`ll start today as any other new post with a saying ( about photography ).

It would not be wrong to speak of people having a compulsion to photograph: to turn experience itself into a way of seeing. ( Susan Sontag  ‘On Photography ‘)

Just reading this amazing book by Susan Sontag ` On photography `I realised that I can add something new to my blog with a little deeper meaning.

Incredibly talented Rosie Hardy :

UK based photographer that specialises in conceptual portraiture. She started photography at an early age and continues to develop her style. Rosie is eager to take on new and exciting opportunities to expand her photography.

by Rosie Hardy

by Rosie Hardy

by Rosie Hardy

by Rosie Hardy

The cover photograph is credited to Rosie Hardy

The cover photograph is credited to Rosie Hardy

 I will like to add just a little bit from her interview about her photograph which was chosen to be a cd cover of the band Maroon❤ :

How did Maroon 5 come across your work?

 This ties in nicely with how wonderful the online community has been to me. Thanks to the hits my flickr page has gotten from these people, when you typed “hands all over” into Google images, one of my older pictures popped up on the first page. I’d actually named that picture “I need to feel your hands all over me,” which was a song lyric from a song I liked at that time. The band’s management saw it and contacted me about possibly remaking it to fit the image the guys had in mind: slightly more sexual, with some real va-va-voom to it! At first, I thought it was a scam (because, seriously, there was no way Maroon 5 wanted to work with me) but I followed it through anyway — and before I knew it, we were putting together the final touches for their album! It still doesn’t feel real, I look at the cover and I know that I made that picture but my brain is struggling to connect the magnitude of it all! 

What was the concept behind the picture that is featured on the cover of Hands All Over?

The cover was based around an image I had taken a couple of years back when I first got into photography. They liked the idea of multiple hands wrapping round someone, and so when it came to putting the cover together we all collaborated to try and make the image appropriate to Maroon 5’s style and message. It’s interesting because there are so many different ways to interpret the album cover, and anyone can take from it what they wish.

For me, the image represents memories, sadness at leaving someone behind and a fire that an old flame will leave, and one that you’re never entirely sure will burn out. For someone else, they might interpret it completely differently. That’s the beautiful thing about Maroon 5’s music, too — you take from it what you need to feel.

 

Interview with Rosie Hardy – Photographer of the HANDS ALL OVER album cover : http://www.facebook.com/notes/maroon-5/interview-with-rosie-hardy-photographer-of-the-hands-all-over-album-cover/45796860378

There is something I would like to share which Rosie added at the end of the interview :

` So, to anyone out there in a parallel position, find what you love, whether it be photography, fluffy bunnies or ant farming — run with it. Seriously, if you throw yourself into something with all your heart and soul, nothing can stop you! Be who you want to be — “life isn’t about finding yourself, it’s about creating yourself!”

This last photograph is the front cover of her fascinating book published on blurb : http://www.blurb.com/books/465177

Last week in college out tutor showed us something that he came across recently. An extraordinary trailer of a new documentary – Waste land.

There is one of the reviews of the documentary. Can`t wait till I see it in the cinema.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ap4TrAOcKNk

One of the powers of great portraiture is its ability to make us wonder about the complete strangers captured within enigmatic works of art. Vik Muniz’s recent series does that: After years of re-creating famous paintings out of trash and other discarded material, the Brazilian artist decided to return to his home country and photograph the garbage pickers who scavenge the world’s largest landfill, Jardim Gramacho. Lucy Walker’s “Waste Land” takes his project one step deeper by actually getting to know Muniz’s models, which brings a compelling human-interest dimension to the sort of art doc otherwise better suited for TV.

Rejecting the idea of a standard career-retrospective docu, Walker opted instead to accompany Muniz on his ambitious Brazilian adventure. Even with that hook, the format remains fairly conventional: Pic begins and ends with clips from an eccentric Brazilian talkshow and gives just enough context of Muniz’s past work (particularly his “Sugar Children” series) before finding its stride.

Once Muniz arrives at Jardim Gramacho, however, Walker’s admirable heal-the-world interest in her surreal new environment immediately takes over. Though others have recently shown interest in other anthill-like landfills, where workers literally seem to live amid the garbage (Leslie Iwerks’ Oscar-nominated short “Recycled Life” and Mai Iskander’s shortlisted 2009 feature “Garbage Dreams” come to mind), it’s an eye-opening experience for First World auds.

Among the garbage pickers, Zumbi rescues books to create a local library, Irma cooks up not-yet-spoiled meat to feed her fellow workers, and Tiao organized the pickers to better protect their rights. These are just three of the hundreds who work there —  proud laborers whom Walker observes both at ground level (where their smiles contradict the seemingly soul-crushing conditions) and from the air (their identities reduced to anonymous specks). That contrast serves as a wonderful metaphor for the way Muniz depicts his subjects: First, he photographs them on a personal level, and then he re-creates their images on a massive scale from bits of recycled material before finally photographing the results from above.

As Agnes Varda demonstrated in “The Gleaners and I,” documentary filmmaking is itself a form of scavenging. Muniz is focused on the end result (his portraits will travel to auction in London, with proceeds set to benefit the garbage pickers), and while he works, Walker’s team goes off to collect details about the private lives of his six models, giving us that rare insight into the real personalities behind these haunting portraits (she also includes a seventh, older gentleman, undereducated but wise in his own way).

Though Sundance auds seemed to connect most with the transformative impact Muniz’s project had on his six characters’ lives, the film is strongest when it’s not actively pulling at your emotions. Especially mesmerizing are the wordless sequences of the garbage pickers at work — Moby-scored montages that hauntingly convey the otherworldly feel of the place. During these scenes, “Waste Land” feels more like an art film than just another film about art.

The Sugar children: Valentina, the fastest; Jacynthe, loves orange juice; Lil Calist can't swim; Valicia bathes in sunday clothes; Big James sweats buckets; Ten-ten's weed necklace (in 6 parts) ,by: Vik Muniz

The Sugar children: Valentina, the fastest; Jacynthe, loves orange juice; Lil Calist can't swim; Valicia bathes in sunday clothes; Big James sweats buckets; Ten-ten's weed necklace (in 6 parts) ,by: Vik Muniz

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